Interesting food find at Mercato Centrale (BGC) last night:

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One food stall had an entire table full of different kinds of seafood, in different sizes. Squid, Lobsters, Crabs, Fish, Shrimps, etc! 

You can get one big lobster for P300 or two smaller ones for P200.

A plate of shrimps is about P130-P140. 

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Although I was hesitant at first, this was the only food stall that offered something different from the usual shawarma-kebab-isaw items that flooded mercato. So I got me some big lobsters!

They cooked the lobsters in butter and served it with rice and suka (vinegar), which scared me a bit — vinegar on lobster?! 

Anyway, it wasn’t bad for its price. It was quite good actually (just throw away the vinegar please). Worth the try, definitely!

I wasn’t able to get the name of the food stall, but they also offer really crispy Lechon Kawali for the seafood haters (your existence is beyond me). 

—-

Mercato Centrale (BGC)

Corner of 34th street and 8th avenue (across MC Home Depot), 34th St, Taguig

0917 840 1152

Sunday will always be defined by breakfast. One day, I will put up a restaurant that will specialize in the different ways of cooking eggs. It’ll be the next food trend. HAHAHA!

Was generally happy with my experience at Ramen Nagi (SM Aura Premier). 
I ordered the Butao King. Tonkotsu broth was creamy and rich, which was excellent! It had a lot of flavors in a bowl. Was a little too fishy (malansa) for my taste but it didn’t bother me too much. 
The Aji Tamago (Marinated Soft-boiled egg) was cooked so well I wanted to clap my hands! HAHA! The yolk was runny and oozed out perfectly. It lacked a bit of that Chasyu taste though (I still prefer the taste of Ramen Bar’s Aji Tamago).
The only thing I didn’t enjoy was the noodles. It had the right bite and hardness to it. But the feeling and texture reminded me of Chinese Mami.
Overall, I’d give them an 8.5/10.  Was generally happy with my experience at Ramen Nagi (SM Aura Premier). 
I ordered the Butao King. Tonkotsu broth was creamy and rich, which was excellent! It had a lot of flavors in a bowl. Was a little too fishy (malansa) for my taste but it didn’t bother me too much. 
The Aji Tamago (Marinated Soft-boiled egg) was cooked so well I wanted to clap my hands! HAHA! The yolk was runny and oozed out perfectly. It lacked a bit of that Chasyu taste though (I still prefer the taste of Ramen Bar’s Aji Tamago).
The only thing I didn’t enjoy was the noodles. It had the right bite and hardness to it. But the feeling and texture reminded me of Chinese Mami.
Overall, I’d give them an 8.5/10. 

Was generally happy with my experience at Ramen Nagi (SM Aura Premier). 

I ordered the Butao King. Tonkotsu broth was creamy and rich, which was excellent! It had a lot of flavors in a bowl. Was a little too fishy (malansa) for my taste but it didn’t bother me too much. 

The Aji Tamago (Marinated Soft-boiled egg) was cooked so well I wanted to clap my hands! HAHA! The yolk was runny and oozed out perfectly. It lacked a bit of that Chasyu taste though (I still prefer the taste of Ramen Bar’s Aji Tamago).

The only thing I didn’t enjoy was the noodles. It had the right bite and hardness to it. But the feeling and texture reminded me of Chinese Mami.

Overall, I’d give them an 8.5/10. 

Burger King, you never fail me. Even though you’ve grown so thin, I will always love you. 

Hanamaruken is finally in Manila, Philippines! 

With over 40 branches in Osaka, this family-run Ramen house is famous for their Slow-cooked Pork Rib Ramen, or what they like to call “Signature Happiness Ramen.”

There’s a reason why Hanamaruken is much-loved in Japan: they take their meat seriously and their passion for pork is reflected in their all their Ramen bowls. That pork rib is to die for! Falls off the bone (you can literally cut them with your chopsticks) and very flavorful. They really know how to put a ramen together with much sophistication. 

Visit them at 2/F Garden Restaurants of Trinoma Mall, QC. They are now on soft-opening :)

Follow them on these social media platforms:

IG: @hanamaruken_ph

Facebook: Hanamaruken Ramen Philippines 

Twitter: @Hanamaruken_PH

Website: hanamaruken.ph

Photo Credit: Hanamaruken’s Facebook Page

Every single day, we are faced with two good choices. Go to work or stay at home. Button down or T-Shirt. Watch a movie or Window Shop. Starbucks or CBTL. Regret or Be Smart. Connect with people or Hibernate. Slice or Dice. Boil or Stew. Regular or Large. Fine Dining or Fast Food. Utensils or Hands. Believe or Be Indifferent. Empathize or Sympathize. Like or Share. Twitter or Facebook.

Every single day is an endless line of choices. Both choices are good. But one will challenge you less.

That day finally came for me. After months of struggle with my heart and my mind, and an infinite amount of procrastination, I’ve come to the point of making a decision: To Leave or To Stay. Both choices are good – Great, even. But one will, in fact, challenge me less.

The choice roots from my wants and my needs – just like everyone else who is looking for reasons to nurse the itch crawling from every nerve in their body. I always say that this generation – the generation that I am part of – is itching to be something, to be somebody, to make a difference, to satisfy one’s urges, to save the world. This generation did not spare me from that itch – the itch to fulfil my want to prove what I am capable of and my need to make something more of myself.

It is my time to cross the threshold.

If not for where I am now, I will not be able to realize these wants and needs. I feel, quite strongly, that I have reached an end and at the same time, a beginning of another journey that will hopefully pave the way for me to realize and learn much more. This realization, that itch, the point of decision, all leads to my desire of becoming a better writer and ultimately, a better person.

The one year and four months I’ve devoted to my job equates to an insurmountable quantity of learning that will never compare to any other high point in my life and I will forever be grateful. You Sir – unknowingly, subconsciously, indirectly – have become a father I never had and a friend that always will be. Again, I will forever be grateful.

This may be the end of my journey here, but I am certain that the relationships I’ve built along the way will last a lifetime (and possibly even beyond that). Don’t take this post as a goodbye, but as a heads up that I – with much certainty, sooner or later, one way or the other – will see you all in Quaipo (or in Xavierville – whichever works best).

"Things Wong Kar Wai Taught Me About Love" 
By Alice Dallow

You will fall in love only once. Obstacles will prevail. The rest of your life is spent recovering. 

Anything that distracts you from the pain of your loss is good. Some people are more successful in this regard than others. 

Eroticising their objects will be the pinnacle of your sexual fulfillment. 

Desire is kept eternally alive by the impossibility of contact. 

The most potent way to exist is to occupy someone else’s imagination. 

Hook up with someone. Live with them. Sleep with them. Tag along. Don’t be fooled. You are only a transitory distraction. Ask for commitment. Declare your love. Watch the set up evaporate. 

Technology will only heighten your sense of desolation making you more keenly aware that no one is trying to call. 

Some coincidences are deliberate. Others just happen.

—-

View short film here » http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0IsRizEe44M

Buzzfeed makes me want to believe in Santa. GIMME!!! » http://www.buzzfeed.com/emofly/clever-gifts-for-food-lovers

Naomi Kawase: My desire to make a film always starts with a personal event that leaves its mark on me and that I want to translate into images. I create fictions from very personal things… I didn’t come into filmmaking from, as you say, watching other films and then wanting to be a director. Fundamentally, it was my love of the medium of film as a tool to capture the moment, the moment that’s happening right now. When film was first invented, there was that excitement about its ability to capture a moment in time, the here and the now. And that’s really the starting point for my interest in the film medium.

Claire Denis: In filmmaking, day by day you’re fighting against all elements, like sailing a boat, you know? If it’s bad weather, you have to react to that. If there’s no wind, you cannot move. So the audience is not always there, in my mind. The audience is like a friend, someone I know I’m going to meet later, but in between that moment of meeting and the moment of making the film—it’s so huge, the gap in between. I cannot even imagine the film finished when we’re shooting. So how can I imagine facing the audience, saying, this is my film, audience that I respect so much! No. I would be lying if I said that. I always hope that if I do things the way I like, I will end up having respected the audience.

Larisa Shepitko: Dovzhenko tried to teach us to see the world. Most of all he warned us against acquiring only the technical skills of the craft. He did not like “followers” who just tried to ape his approach. He urged us to be faithful to ourselves, to trust our own feelings and to stand up for our views. I did not realize at the time how difficult this is. You come to understand such things as you grow older… He used to tell us that when starting on a new film we should know what new things it would tell the audiences, and whether it would foster their better human qualities. I think this is the goal of art.

Safi Faye: I don’t know how a film is born. It’s an idea that comes; I then begin to work on it—while cooking, while getting dressed, while bathing, everywhere I went… I have always felt that a film belongs to the public… One need not explain her conceptualization, her process. The film—either one likes it or not. The story—you like it or you don’t… My sense of creativity, though, is to let the audience imagine what the images signify. It is not necessary to make everything explicit for the audience. They have to think. Creativity invites such thinking; that is why I create.

Maya Deren: Instead of envying the script and dialogue writers, the trained actors, the elaborate staffs and sets, the enormous production budgets of the profession film, the amateur should make use of the one great advantage which all professionals envy him, namely, freedom—both artistic and physical… The most important part of your equipment is yourself: your mobile body, your imaginative mind, and your freedom to use both. Make sure you do use them.

(Source: strangewood)

The coming together of the film community to support the victims of Super Typhoon Yolanda. Come one, come all!!!